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The nutritional information provided on this website has been thoroughly researched and practiced daily with our own very precious Bichon Frise - we have seen fantastic improvements in Maggie's health with the organic raw food diet we advocate. However, we do advise you to take responsibility for educating yourself  further on this topic before making changes in your dog's diet. We are not responsible for any misinterpretation of the information offered here.

Bichon Frise: Diet Makes a Difference

by Jonne Hubin


What does every Bichon Frise lover want most for their precious pup? It's pretty simple. We want them to enjoy a healthy, happy, long life with us. And what's the best way to make this happen? That's easy. Provide an environment like the one dogs have had naturally over the past 10,000+ years, which consists of: exercise in fresh air and sunshine and a carnivorous diet - that is, a diet mainly of raw meat and bones.

Dogs traditionally have hunted and eaten small prey which provided them with muscle meat, organs, bones and the vegetable contents of the prey's stomach - all of which were raw. Since we can't provide prey, the next best thing is to purchase organic meat that is antibiotic and hormone-free and comes from animals that are grass fed - organic ground beef or bison and bones. It's a good idea to buy local if you can.

Farmers markets and health food stores are the places to check first. To locate a farmer in your vicinity who produces grass-fed beef, check out www.eatwild.com on the internet.

If you are in the city, you might try calling supermarkets- some are beginning to carry organic meats. If you'd like to try bison, www.northstarbison.com will ship to your door. In Virginia, the Virginia Independent Farmers and Consumers Association has a list of sources. Other states may have similar organizations. Both farmers and some supermarkets will also be able to supply you with meaty bones, a source for much needed calcium and cartilage.

Part II Preparing your Bichon Frise's Meal

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